jose whales seeds

Jose whales seeds

The legendary co-breeder behind popular strain Original Glue (aka GG#4, or Gorilla Glue) has passed away, leaving behind a legacy of maximal THC, pungent terpenes, and profound relaxation few could hope to match.

A lucky accident

Joesy “Don” Whales passed away May 6 in Las Vegas from complications after a fall, according to a spokesperson for his company, GG Strains. He was 69 years old.

The legacy of Original Glue

They were chasing potency and that astringent, fuel bite of diesel, with its weird chocolate inverse; all facets of cannabis terpenes, or aroma compounds. A couple of lucky accidents led to a strain that is a triple back-crossed Diesel, with some Chocolate Thai and other goodies down deep in the genes. Joesy and Watty recognized the new plant as a potential one in a billion combination of THC and terps.

STORY: Original Glue # 4 was accidently created by Joesy Whales when some Chem Sis plants he was growing hermied and pollinated his Sour Dubb. Tired of seeded gardens, Joesy tossed out the strain. But his buddy, Mardogg, still had some seeds. Mardogg popped the beans years later and ended up with 4 pheno’s of the GG, deciding #4 was worth keeping.

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STORY: Original Glue # 4 was accidently created by Joesy Whales when some Chem Sis plants he was growing hermied and pollinated his Sour Dubb. Tired of seeded gardens, Joesy tossed out the strain. But his buddy, Mardogg, still had some seeds. Mardogg popped the beans years later and ended up with 4 pheno’s of the GG, deciding #4 was worth keeping.

Where is the Chocolate Diesel. to my knowledge it was (Sour Dubb x Chem Sis)x Chocolate Diesel.

Jose whales seeds

Almost all the big seed companies, and many smaller ones, sell their seeds by advertising in magazines like Skunk , High Times , W , and Treating Yourself — a magazine that focuses on the medical side of cannabis use. Because it’s illegal to send marijuana seeds to the United States, all of them have disclaimers stating that they don’t take orders from the States and that they don’t sell seeds to customers in America.

With so much money and prestige at stake, how intense is the competition?

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How much of that money trickles back to the seed companies? $100-million? $200-million? More? The seed companies themselves aren’t saying. [np-related]

I don’t think the amazing growth in the seed business could’ve occurred without High Times magazine and the Cannabis Cup. Nowadays, of course, wannabe growers can get all kinds of information about seeds, genetics and quality of the plants on the Internet, but in the halcyon days of the industry, winning the Cannabis Cup was the only surefire way of getting your strain and your company — your brand — out into the world. And if you were good enough or lucky enough to win? Your reputation — and the money that followed — was assured.

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It’s unclear just how big the market is because the majority of transactions are quasi-legal and exact numbers are difficult to pin down. The 2006 U.N. World Drug Report suggested that an estimated 164 million people worldwide use cannabis regularly and that the global market for cannabis and cannabis-based products ranged from $10-billion to $60-billion annually. I think that’s actually a conservative estimate. In 2011, a study done by an independent financial and information firm called See Change Strategy estimated the “national market for medical marijuana was worth $1.7-billion in 2011 and could reach $8.9-billion in five years.” Another study, this one by Jon Gettman, who holds a PhD in public policy and is a former national director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), includes illegal sales and estimates that the U.S. market alone is worth $113-billion a year.