how to stop weeds from growing in your yard

Taming a lawn full of weeds might feel daunting, but it’s all about keeping your turf as healthy as can be.

My lawn is all weeds. What should I do?

So, the best way to get rid of weeds is to make your lawn an environment where it’s difficult for them to thrive.

Any tricks for killing weeds in the lawn without killing grass?

  1. Examine your lawn to figure out what weeds you’re dealing with. Since treatments are made to target specific weeds, you’ll need to figure out what’s plaguing your lawn before buying products.
  2. Choose a treatment made both for the type of weeds and the stage they’re in. If you plan to target weeds in spring before the growing season, you’ll need a pre-emergent. For established weeds, get a post-emergent.
  3. Kill the weeds by carefully following the directions for both how much product to apply and when to use. Read the bag at least three times before starting to be safe!
  4. Keep up with a proper lawn maintenance schedule to help keep your lawn weed-free.
      and aerate if necessary.
    • Give your turf one last short mow and fertilization treatment before winter .
    • Come spring, start fresh with pre-emergent and hand pick any lingering weeds.
    • Mow your lawn regularly in spring and summer, being careful not to remove more than a third of grass at a time.

How to stop weeds from growing in your yard

When you can’t remove weeds, the next best thing is to chop off their heads. With annual weeds, dead­heading buys you a few weeks of time before the weed “seed rain” begins. Cutting back the tops of perennial weeds, like bindweed, reduces reseeding and forces them to use up food reserves and exhaust their supply of root buds, thus limiting their spread.

Tightly planted beds leave no room for unwanted visitors. Photo: Todd Meier

3. Weed when the weeding’s good

Heat treating weedy compost destroys many of the microscopic life-forms that give compost its punch, so it’s a good idea to reprocess cooked compost for two to three weeks before using it in the garden. Place it in a plastic storage bin with a handful of earthworms borrowed from your garden and it will soon be laced with humic acids and other plant-pleasing compounds.

Few experiences compare to the joy of watching weeds shrivel in the sun after a morning weeding session, but then what should you do with them? Their best resting place, of course, is a compost pile or bin, which is the end of the story if the weeds going in are free of seeds. In reality, however, a good half of the weeds you pull probably hold seeds. Separating the seedies from other weedies is impractical, so weed seeds in compost are customarily killed by raising the temperature in the heap.

Heat is the key to composting weeds

I notice that weeds like Horsetail and Morning Glory are not mentioned in this article, their roots go so very deep (have heard horsetail root being found 36′ down) and any tiny little piece of root from either of those weeds quickly grows into a new plant with a huge root system. I don’t use weed killers, I do the digging them out thing, but I’m so tired of having to do it over and over and over every spring and summer. BTW, I cannot afford to buy and use mulch and in my temperate and usually rather wet location it usually is not needed for its other uses (keeping the soil moist and cool in summer and protected from frost in winter).