how to legally grow medical cannabis in illinois

How to legally grow medical cannabis in illinois

In general, you need to take the time to understand the ins and outs of MMJ cultivation before starting. This will give you the best comprehension of growing requirements, plant growth cycles, lighting types and colors, and oh-so-much more. We promise that this research is worth it for cultivating cannabis at home in Illinois.

If you do not own the property you’re residing in, you must get permission from the property owner in order to grow. Otherwise, this is technically illegal. So, always make sure:

Cultivating cannabis at home can provide medical marijuana patients a certain freedom that purchasing from a dispensary simply cannot. However, it’s also something that takes a whole lot of time and dedication. If you think growing cannabis is for you, there’s a lot you need to be aware of surrounding at-home cultivation in Illinois. Who can cultivate? How many plants can you grow in Illinois? These questions and everything in between, we’re covering it all down below.

Make sure you’re growing your cannabis in a space that’s big enough for your plants to thrive, as well as spacious enough for you to examine your plants when necessary. Factors like watering, temperature, and moisture are all crucial for cannabis cultivation, as is a well-developed lighting system. Marijuana thrives when a grower can replicate the sun’s color spectrum, but this can often be pricey and take some time to get right. Be patient! Cultivation such as this takes practice to perfect.

Where Can You Cultivate MMJ Cannabis?

First, it’s essential to establish that not everybody can cultivate cannabis at home in Illinois. Even though the state has legalized both recreational and medicinal cannabis, only medical patients are allowed to apply for home cultivation in the Land of Lincoln. Those who are 21 and older and do not possess an MMJ card are simply not allowed to cultivate cannabis at home whatsoever.

The number of plants that a medical patient can grow may change with time as the state continues to adjust its MMJ program rules and regulations. But, for now, starting with just a handful of plants is an excellent way to understand not only how to cultivate, but how much you and your medical conditions require.

If you’re interested in cultivation medical cannabis at home in Illinois but don’t quite know where to start, Elevate Holistics has you covered. Our team offers a comprehensive (yet affordable) grow consultation to help you master every aspect of indoor cultivation. Whether it is lighting, bloom cycles, or cloning, we’re here to assist you in perfecting your at-home cultivations.

How Many Plants Can You Grow in Illinois?

If you have the time and space for growing medical cannabis—and an Illinois medical card, of course—at-home cultivation may be the perfect choice for you.

Obviously, we’re focusing on at-home cultivation, so we’re talking about where you can grow medical marijuana in your residence. Lawfully, you must grow your cannabis plants in locked, enclosed spaces that are not visible by the public eye whatsoever. Essentially, no one outside of your home should be able to tell that you’re cultivating cannabis. Along these lines, any minors cannot have access to your grow station.

How to legally grow medical cannabis in illinois

Cannabis is legal in Illinois. But there are limits on who can buy it and where you can use it.

Public housing

Even though cannabis is legal, landlords can ban smoking it in their units. This includes medical cannabis. However, a landlord cannot stop a tenant from using medical cannabis in other ways. If your lease prohibits smoking or other use of cannabis, breaking that rule could lead to an eviction .

Private rental housing

Cannabis is still illegal under federal law. So you cannot use or possess cannabis at your home if you live in federally-subsidized public housing. You could be evicted or denied housing. This includes past cannabis use or criminal charges. This also includes guests. There is also a ban on all smoking in federally-subsidized public housing.