how to grow the best weed indoors in soil

How to grow the best weed indoors in soil

Loam soil is a combination of sand, silt, and clay, typically in a 40/40/20 ratio. It has at least 20% organic compounds and can vary from being easy to work with to incredibly complex. To identify a loam soil, squeeze it. It should form a loose ball that quickly threatens to break apart.

The apparent simplicity of picking soil often fools newcomers, and they frequently make mistakes that cost them their harvest. The truth is, you have to make a lot of considerations. For example, the soil you use for indoor growing is not the same one you’ll need for an outdoor grow. Then there is the small matter of things like pH, drainage, and a host of other criteria.

What Does Loam Soil Look Like?

As long as you choose correctly, your cannabis soil should already have a vast array of nutrients because it consists of organic material. One mistake is to try and add organic material such as animal manure and rotting vegetables directly to the plants as fertilizers. You must break down the content first if you want your marijuana plants’ roots to absorb the nutrients.

This type of soil is among the best organic options for cannabis. Clays consist of fine crystalline particles created via chemical reactions amongst minerals or other natural resources. You can mold or shape clay soil, but it is hard to work with and drains poorly.

Pros & Cons of Growing Cannabis in Soil

It is unlikely that your cannabis soil will have the ideal drainage, texture, and water retaining abilities. Fortunately, there are a host of amendments available to alter the drainage, texture, and water-retaining capacity of your soil. Here are four of the most popular:

How to grow the best weed indoors in soil

Here’s organic “super” soil up close

Some popular soil examples that I’ve used with good results include:

Worm Castings

More About Common Amendments to Alter Texture, Drainage & Water Retention of Soil

When it comes to growing cannabis in soil, unless you’re using a brand that is known for making soil that is specifically cannabis-friendly, there are a few things that you need to consider before starting a grow.

Their Ocean Forest soil mix is “hotter” soil (higher levels of nutrients) that contains ingredients that cannabis plants love, including earthworm castings, bat guano, fish meal and crab meal. The nutrients contained in the soil will provide everything your plant needs for several weeks. Although it might give young seedlings just a touch of nutrient burn at first, they can be started in Ocean Forest soil and will soon be able to use the nutrients and start growing quickly. Some growers might put a little big of Happy Frog on top of a container of Ocean Forest, just to make it a little more gentle for seedlings the first week or two.

Important Cannabis Soil Considerations

What should you look for in good cannabis soil?

Recommended soil nutrients:

The first step in odor control is making sure temperature and humidity are under control in your grow space—high temperature and humidity will perpetuate odors.

Plants need fresh air to thrive and carbon dioxide (CO2) is essential to the process of photosynthesis. This means you will need a steady stream of air flowing through your grow room, which will allow you to move hot air out of the space and bring cool air in.

Before watering, check the pH of your water and add pH Up or Down if needed.

If you can’t afford both MH and HPS bulbs, start with HPS as they deliver more light per watt. Magnetic ballasts are cheaper than digital ballasts, but run hotter, are less efficient, and harder on your bulbs. Digital ballasts are generally a better option, but are more expensive. Beware of cheap digital ballasts, as they are often not well shielded and can create electromagnetic interference that will affect radio and WiFi signals.

Check temperature and humidity levels

What type of container you use will depend on the grow medium, the system, and the size of your plants.

Because the amount of light a plant receives is so important, you’ll need to make your indoor grow space light-tight. Light leaks during dark periods will confuse your plants and can cause them to produce male flowers or revert to a different stage.

You’ll likely yield about the same amount of weed in both cases, but more harvests mean you’ll have fresh weed to smoke more often and have more opportunities to grow different strains. But more harvests also means more work in cleaning up the space between harvests, trimming, etc.

LED grow lights

HID (high-intensity discharge) lights are the industry standard, widely used for their combination of output, efficiency, and value. They cost a bit more than incandescent or fluorescent fixtures, but produce far more light per unit of electricity used. Conversely, they are not as efficient as LED lighting, but they cost much less.

For a root system to develop and thrive, they will need the following: