growing weed plants without nutrients

There are some complications in working with organic fertilizers. The main issue is if your weed plants have a nutrient deficiency, it takes longer for a plant to absorb organic powder nutrients, which can increase the damage to plants. Liquid nutrients act much quicker. Other disadvantages:

These micronutrients are needed as well, but in much smaller quantities:

When creating a first batch of tea, keep the solution simple. If you use city water, allow it to sit and breathe so chlorine can break down. Once your tea is brewing, keep it out of direct sunlight and make sure the air pump is running and oxygen is being pushed through the water.

Compost tea recipe for marijuana plants

Giving weed plants the proper amount of nutrients requires careful monitoring. Many growers start at a solution dose lower than recommended and work their way up until plants respond optimally. Too little nutrients and the plants will have stunted growth, while too many can lead to nutrient burn and lockout.

Nitrogen is also necessary to create nucleic acid, an essential ingredient in DNA or RNA, and without it, cells won’t be able to grow and multiply.

When applied to soil, you’re adding to the soil food web by introducing a healthy population of microorganisms that are aerobic in nature. These organisms hold nutrients, aerate soil, aid water retention, increase nutrient absorption in the cannabis plant, help grow healthy roots, and help prevent diseases.

Nitrogen

We recommend not using nutrients made for indoor growing for outdoor plants, as they are usually composed of synthetic mineral salts and can damage soil bacteria.

Only start a tea when you can apply it within 36 hours of brewing it. When using as a spray, apply in the evening or morning when the temperature is low and without direct sunlight. This period is also when the stomata—pores in the plant’s foliage—are open to receive nutrients.

Answer: Possible? Yes.

With marijuana plants, you get what you put into it. If you don’t put a lot of effort into your grow, most of the time your plant won’t reward you with a lot of yield.

Question: Is it possible to grow marijuana without nutrients? Or to grow without proper soil, for example using dirt you dig up outside?

The best thing you can do at this stage is to arm yourself with lots of knowledge. As you learn more about what works and doesn’t work, you’ll learn about all the ways you can save money while growing and still get outstanding yields.

Unless you’re lucky and your backyard soil is fertile, probably not.

When someone says “no nutrients,” what they often mean is that they’re planting in nutrient-rich soil, and then more or less leaving the plant alone.

While not as guaranteed to produce quality results as super soil, there are plenty of good mass-produced brands not necessarily intended for marijuana growers, but which will work fine.

These are naturally available in the soil, but often not in the quantities necessary for this kind of cultivation, so you can’t just say “no nutrients!” and stick a plant in the backyard.

Set yourself up for success

It’s impossible to grow without any nutrients—plants need to get them from somewhere.

So, can you grow cannabis without nutrients?

Or do you prefer to give calculated amounts of nutrients throughout the grow?

What Nutrients are we Talking About?

The downside is the high initial investment.

So is growing cannabis without nutrients possible?