growing weed outdoors in massachusetts

When making edibles at home, such as cannabis-infused beverages or baked goods, it can be challenging to distribute cannabis evenly throughout a product. This can make it difficult to control potency and dosage of the edible.

When making concentrates, extracting cannabis oil with flammable materials, such as propane and butane, is illegal. These materials release vapors that can easily trigger explosions. Consider alternative extraction methods.

Lower Risk of Electrical Fires

Responsible Home Cultivation

For more information on fire safety and cannabis in your home, click here to view a flyer from the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services.

Cannabis Oil Extraction

If you have any marijuana products in your home, be sure to store them away in a locked storage container and out of reach of children and pets.

Massachusetts law allows residents of the Commonwealth to grow marijuana at home. There are a few things you should know about Home Cultivation.

Cannabis-infused Edibles

Growing cannabis plants indoors often requires high-powered lamps, temperature controls, and expanded levels of ventilation which can overload electrical circuits and cause fires. To lower your risk of electrical fires, consult a licensed electrician to ensure you are following all relevant fire codes.

At the indoor cultivation facilities that grew 97.7 percent of the flower available at Massachusetts dispensaries in 2020, rows of cannabis clones are typically planted under electricity-hogging lights in pots full of a sterile soil substitute such as “coco coir,” a wispy fibrous material made from coconut husks that can support plant roots, and fed synthetic nutrients. The air is heavily filtered; workers and visitors must don hair nets, lab coats, and shoe covers to avoid tracking in outside contaminants.

Ono figures that despite the region’s limited growing season, outdoor-grown marijuana’s vastly lower upfront costs and artisanal marketability will make it a winner when the state cannabis sector matures or interstate trade is legalized and prices decline.

The challenge is even steeper outdoors, where the state’s humid autumns promote microbial growth. Last season, nearly all the marijuana grown outdoors in Massachusetts failed its first microbe test, according to industry executives, while just 16.5 percent of all flower grown in the state (mostly indoors) flunked on the first try.

Regulators will reconsider the state’s strict microbe standard

Backed into a corner by the tight microbe limit and pesticide ban, most Massachusetts marijuana growers have essentially engineered nature out of the process.

alt=”At Holistic Health Group in Middleborough, cofounder Colonel Boothe, left, and cultivation director Geoffrey Phillips displayed vacuum-sealed bags containing a portion of their outdoor-grown marijuana crop that failed the state's microbe test.” width=”” height=”” />At Holistic Health Group in Middleborough, cofounder Colonel Boothe, left, and cultivation director Geoffrey Phillips displayed vacuum-sealed bags containing a portion of their outdoor-grown marijuana crop that failed the state's microbe test. Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff

At EOS Farm in Pittsfield, founder Suehiko Ono is preparing to plant over two acres of outdoor-grown marijuana this summer, part of his mission to prove cannabis can serve as an ancillary cash crop for struggling family farms and that increasing the diversity of soil microbes actually makes marijuana safer.

Meanwhile, state agriculture officials have banned the use of nearly all pesticides and fungicides on legal marijuana, unlike other states that allow the application of certain natural compounds used on organic food.