growing cannabis clones in soil

If they look good after a week or so, go ahead and introduce them to the rest of your garden.

When selecting a mother plant to clone from, look for plants that are healthy, sturdy, and at least two months into the vegetative cycle. Don’t take a clone off a plant once it starts flowering.

When getting ready to transplant, be sure to keep the environment sterile. Transplant shock can occur, so be sure to use gloves when handling clones.

A mother plant is any cannabis plant you take a clone from. Mothers should be healthy and sturdy, as their genetics will pass on to the clones—if you have a sickly mother plant, its clones will also be sickly.

Disease

If you’re using cubes of any kind, you’ll need to invest in a tray, a tray-cell insert, and a dome. The clones will go in the cubes, the cubes into the tray-cells, and all of that sits in a tray which will hold water. To keep in humidity, make sure to use a dome over your tray, and you may even want to use a heat mat.

Check your clones daily to make sure they have enough water by checking the bottom of the tray or auto-cloner. To increase humidity, you can spray water on the leaves with a spray bottle. If any clones die, discard them so they don’t cause mold in the rest of the clones and also to give the remaining clones more space.

Be sure to inspect all areas of your clone for the presence of pests. Large pests such as fungus gnats and spider mites can be spotted relatively easily.

How to take a cutting from a cannabis plant

A typical clone is about 6 inches in length, give or take, and after cutting it off the mother plant, the clone is put into a medium such as a root cube and given a hormone to encourage root growth.

Never hesitate to research a dispensary or grow facility before buying clones.

Growing cannabis clones in soil

For this reason, cloning is most often used as a secondary reproductive process to create starter plants once a plant breeder has developed a favorable cultivar where genetically identical traits are desired.

Small amounts of plant tissue are taken from mother specimens to produce large quantities of identical clones. The plant tissue is placed in agar and stored until new hormones are introduced to trigger various stages of growth and development.

Cannabis growers use the term cloning to refer to the process of asexual reproduction that takes cuttings from a mother plant to create numerous young plants. This process is most often used when you have desirable traits that you would like to reproduce (i.e. favorable cannabinoid profile or yield that you want to reproduce).

Young plants are extremely sensitive to their environment. Light, humidity, and temperature must be managed closely to keep your plants healthy before moving them to the vegetative growth stage, where they become more resilient to their environment.

Seed Propagation vs. Cutting Propagation

In other agricultural sectors, this method of reproduction is called cutting propagation.

Tissue culture is a lesser-known method of cannabis propagation that has a similar goal of cutting propagation. Tissue cultures are taken from a small plant cutting and placed in a dense nutrient culture, which is often a type of agar. Using the tissue culture method, small pieces of plant tissue from your cannabis cuttings can eventually create hundreds of clones.

Once the plant’s roots emerge in about 4 to 7 days, you can safely increase light levels to 150-200 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 and decrease your humidity to 80%.

Alternative Methods to Cloning Cannabis

Once your cuttings have developed roots, applying a light treatment with a high ratio of blue to red light can enhance root growth. Many studies have shown the benefits of blue light for root development in a range of crops.

We recommend a light treatment of 65% red light, 30% blue, and 5% white to create a fully developed rootstock before moving to the vegetative growth stage.