difference between dill weed and dill seed

Difference between dill weed and dill seed

Working on a recipe that calls for dill weed or dill seed? If you don’t have any on hand, there are several things that you can use in its place, including other forms of dill, tarragon, celery seed or caraway seed. Here’s how to make a successful substitution, using what you have on hand.

Dried vs. Fresh

Substituting fresh dill for dried dill (or vice versa) is easy to do. Just stick to these proportions, and you’ll get great results:

Substituting Other Herbs

Dill seeds taste similar to dill weed, but they have a slightly bitter edge to them. They appear frequently in pickles, bread, salad dressing, and soup recipes. While you might be tempted to use dill weed as a substitute for dill seeds, you'll get better results if you use caraway seeds or celery seeds in their place. Replace them measure for measure, and you should come close to the intended flavor.

Difference between dill weed and dill seed

You can also use dill weed as a garnish in many salads, dressings, cold soups, and seafood. Or with spreads like cream cheese, sour cream, and more.

Dill seeds have a strong slightly bitter flavor which reminds of camphor and gets stronger if the seeds are heated. Dill weed is also available as a dried herb. However, it has a weaker flavor than fresh dill.

Related Questions

Dill is mostly known as a spice used for pickling. It pairs well with spinach, asparagus, potatoes, grains, zucchini, and summer squash. However, dill is also a common ingredient in many dishes with fish, seafood, and some traditional salads like the Greek tzatziki.

Dill Seed vs Dill Weed

Dried dill weed is used in many dishes like soups, dressings, salads, seafood, and chicken to improve their flavor.