cannabis growing methods

Cannabis growing methods

Low Stress Training involves bending the branches slowly so that they grow in a certain direction. This is similar to putting braces on your teeth.

Sea of Green is a fast growing technique that lets you quickly grow many small plants. This is a good method for people who are short on time and need short plants due to height restrictions.

5. Monster Cropping

In order to switch the plant back to vegetative growth, you simply need to give the plants more light than you would in the flowering stage.

This is more of a training technique for young cannabis plants , which encourages bushy growth, increases extra flowering and lateral branching. This technique popped through people’s mistakes while trying to do the Topping technique.

8. SOG (Sea of Green)

This technique has the name Monster Cropping because it results in so many flowers, so it has almost a monster result. Monster Cropping is where you take clones of a plant during the flowering phase, replant them, and revert them back to the vegetative growth stage. This allows you to save on seeds, have have continous harvests.

Cannabis growing methods

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To run these advanced facilities, cannabis companies need researchers who are experienced in plant science, microbiology, chemistry and other scientific disciplines — and they are turning to academia to find them. “Instead of underground growers, they are hiring lots of university-educated and trained people,” says Zheng.

Cannabis analytical labs are becoming more professional. “I’ve seen an evolution in the sophistication of the industry,” Brauninger says. “Most of the people running labs now have PhDs and experience in the pharmaceutical industry. It’s light years more sophisticated than five or six years ago.”

In the United Kingdom, for example, strict rules concerning THC levels in medical cannabis mean that labs can find it difficult to get the sample analytical standards that they need for comparing products. The licences required to handle the standards are the same as those needed by a lab doing research on the drug itself. “It’s ludicrous that analytical standards are so tightly controlled,” says James. “The cannabis products are treated the same as a kilo of cocaine.”

Testing, testing

Such labs are beginning to adopt standardized tests for potency and purity using gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. They are also developing methods to identify and measure levels of THC and other cannabinoids, as well as contaminants such as heavy metals and pesticide residues. “These aren’t necessarily new tests that have been created for this industry, but the type that had to be applied for this product,” says Brauninger.

One sign of progress is that cannabis products can be recalled when they fail testing, just like other medical or consumer items. In December 2016 and January 2017, Organigram had to recall some of its products when residues from pesticides not approved for use in cannabis were detected. Although the company’s reputation took a short-term hit, Purcell says that recalls are a sign of the industry’s growing professionalism. Consumers can be confident that cannabis goods have been made “under a controlled, regulated environment and tested in a certified lab that guarantees safety and quality”.

Independent testing labs have sprung up to help growers to meet the requirements, but like the wider cannabis industry, they face growing pains. “At the moment it’s a bit like the Wild West, with different rules in different places,” says Andrew James, marketing director of Ellutia in Ely, UK, which makes chemical analysis equipment for the cannabis industry, among other markets. “It can be hard to know what to test for, how to test and where to do it.”

“For a product to be sold in most US states, it has to be tested externally,” says Jahan Marcu, director of experimental pharmacology and behavioral research at the International Research Center on Cannabis and Mental Health in New York City.

Part of Nature Outlook: Cannabis