blob og seeds

Blob og seeds

Blob OG is supposedly a strain that originated in Western Washington. The heavy hitting, body-driven strain incorporates the stimulating mental elements of Diesel crossed against the potent indica-dominant genetics of Pre-99 Chemdawg. This cross offers lightness in the body and a mental edge from the Diesel. Because it can stretch toward 30% THC, sativa-dominant hybrid or not, this much potency will absolutely put the uninitiated consumer down for the count.

Blob OG is supposedly a strain that originated in Western Washington. The heavy hitting, body-driven strain incorporates the stimulating mental elements of Diesel crossed against the potent indica-dominant genetics of Pre-99 Chemdawg. This cross offers lightness in the body and a mental edge from the Diesel. Because it can stretch toward 30% THC, sativa-dominant hybrid or not, this much potency will absolutely put the uninitiated consumer down for the count.

Blob og seeds

The sprouting of a seed is clearly a crucial stage in a plant’s life. Yet one part of the process has long been shrouded in mystery: How do seeds know when there’s enough water to germinate?

Boeynaems studies neurodegenerative diseases, not plants. But his lab teamed up with that of study coauthor and plant biologist Yanniv Dorone, a postdoc at the Carnegie Institution for Science at Stanford, because of the strange proteins at work: a group of floppy shape-shifting molecules known as intrinsically disordered proteins. In the last decade, researchers have found mammalian and yeast genomes littered with sequences for these molecules. Many are implicated in forming problematic insoluble structures in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly if they carry prion-like domains that seed protein clumps. “These proteins are disordered and floppy, but they’re also very sticky, which makes them prone to aggregate,” Boeynaems explains.

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“Germination is a really critical stage in a plant’s life cycle. But we don’t totally understand why some seeds germinate under ideal conditions and others don’t,” says plant biologist Lucia Strader of Duke University, who was not involved with the study. “This may be part of the answer.”