best lights for growing weed plants

Best lights for growing weed plants

Kelvins refer to the warmth and color of the light being emitted. During the vegetative stage, cannabis thrives best when provided cool daytime blue light with approximately 6,400 kelvins. Conversely, flowering cannabis performs best with a warmer red light of 2,700 kelvins.

Light Spectrum

Our complete grow kits include everything you need to go from seed to your very own supply of high grade medical cannabis.

4. Sunblaster CFL Grow Light

As a general rule, however, CFLs produce the least amount of light, so these lights are best used for germinating or producing clones.

Best lights for growing weed plants

In countries like Canada, where the federal government has legalized recreational cannabis, there is the ability to do more research. The University of Guelph is one organization that is leading the way in this research. As he states in this article from HortiDaily — Michael Dixon, Director of Environmental Control Research at Guelph says: “We have found that the optimal LED spectral recipe changes with every strain of cannabis.” This is a very important statement for growers to consider! Will you be growing just one strain in your grow the entire time? If not, what spectrum do you choose? Yet if the added blue light in flower only increases your THC levels by 4% is there a justifiable ROI in the cost of the added light spectrum?? If so, can you do that by just adding a few MH lamps? Or does the ROI make sense to go all LED? (1000w DE MH lamps are now available with the PL Light NXT 1000w DE fixtures).

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ALWAYS ask for a light plan that shows an average light level in micromoles AND a uniformity average (hopefully above 90% uniformity). Most LEDs are a very directional source of lighting. If a crop is grown under lighting that is not uniform across your canopy but instead has “hot spots” and “dark spots” it will cause you trouble as the hot spots will use more water, evaporate water, absorb nutrients, etc. at a different rate of speed then the dark spots! To truly have an “apples to apples” comparison be sure to compare light plans with the same targeted light level in micromoles and close to the same average uniformity number. If a supplier cannot provide you with these numbers then it may not be someone you should be considering.

No manufacturer , supplier, or customer can state they know the optimum LED recipe for cannabis (or tomato’s, or cucumbers, or orchids, etc.) as nobody has tested and tried multiple, different spectrums with each one being tuned to a specific strain or cultivar of each plant type to be able to render a quantifiable opinion.

Disclaimer Nothing in PL Light Systems including, but not limited to, written, visual, or editorial content, or external links on the website and digital journal, shall in any way be considered as promoting any illegal or illicit activities within your jurisdiction.

The best advice I have is to get a comparison of your ROI done by a versatile company. One that can offer both technologies where you can have light plans designed to the same levels with both technologies. Don’t trust just what the LED guy says or the only HPS guy says. Look at both, do your own math. Know what works for the strains you are growing and measure your own ROI. The easiest way to do this is going to this link and ask your local PL Light Territory Manager for advice as we are the “Lighting Knowledge Company” and whether you decide to use LED or HPS, you will get a true and honest comparison of both technologies.

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Light Planning

Do this math with your LEDs as well. The PL Light TopLED is 320 watts so the BTUs will be 1092 BTUs. While that looks like a big savings it will take at least two times the amount of our LEDs to get to the same light level as a 1000w HPS. On the other side of this argument is that the LED fixtures do not provide the radiant heat as HPS and your crop roots will perform better with warmth. It is proven that there is a direct correlation between heat and crop production. Plants grow slower, producing less fruit the colder they are. In northern climates many growers rely on the heat from HPS to warm their crops.